1. Whenever there is a tragedy

    Comment

    Whenever there is a tragedy, it gives us the opportunity to care, to give, to help and to serve. ~Ajahn Brahm

    Whenever there is a tragedy, it gives us the opportunity to care, to give, to help and to serve-Ajahn Brahm

     

  2. Wisdom and Compassion: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    Comment

    pink-lotus in water animation

    The Master views the parts with compassion, because he understands the whole.
    (Tao Te Ching, Chapter 39)

    THE ESSENCE
    Wisdom and compassion are the essence of an enlightened life.

    Wisdom and compassion are inextricably linked. They are two sides of the same coin. They are a unit. Separating them is an artificial, intellectual act.

    When compassion is taken out of the equation, wisdom turns into worthless platitudes, which easily become destructive. Without compassion, wisdom degenerates into an escapist entanglement in concepts, theories and dogmas.

    Wisdom is more than just cleverness plus compassion. It differs in quality to a point where it may seem to have little to do with cleverness. Sometimes, the actions of wise people seem to go against common sense. In fact, wise people often act in ways which are considered foolish by clever people.

    The greatest love seems indifferent, the greatest wisdom seems childish.
    (Tao Te Ching, Chapter 41)

    They would, for example, sacrifice their own interests for the sake of others, or accept defeat, sometimes even their own destruction, when they had every chance of winning or escaping. They would refuse to speak in their own defense when it seems expedient to do so, or they would speak up when it means putting themselves in jeopardy. Often, wise people would ignore what seem like clever strategies, and choose suffering instead.

    When wisdom is taken out of the equation, compassion is perverted, for it loses direction totally. It becomes like a lost ship without navigational means drifting aimlessly on a stormy ocean. A good example of love without wisdom is when parents spoil their children, giving them everything they want, without giving them direction in life. Another example is if someone lacks the courage to tell his friend when she is wrong out of fear he might lose her friendship. A friend that allows you to go astray does not qualify as a friend. Continue reading

  3. Dhamma is upheld by living in harmony with it

    Comment

    Dhamma is not upheld by talking about it. Dhamma is upheld by living in harmony with it. ~Buddha

    Buddha

  4. Prince Ajatasattu ordering that the soles of his father’s feet be cut open with a knife

    Comment
    Prince Ajatasattu ordering that the soles of his father's feet be cut open with a knife

    Prince Ajatasattu ordering that the soles of his father’s feet be cut open with a knife

    47. Prince Ajatasattu ordering that the soles of his father’s feet be cut open with a knife

    Venerable Devadatta instigated Prince Ajatasattu to kill his father King Bimbisara as he thought that, if the Prince became King in succession to his father, he would be able to take the place of the Buddha. The Prince was of the view that whatever his teacher Devadatta said was good, and was on his way to carry out his plan to murder his father. His father questioned him and the Prince admitted that he plotted to kill him because he wanted to become King. King Bimbisara gave up the throne in his favour.

    After that, Venerable Devadatta told him that he would be able to rule without any risk of losing the throne only if his father was no longer alive. Prince Ajatasattu was impressed with this suggestion. But he did nor wish to kill his father straightway. So he caused his father to be cast in prison. At first, the Princes mother, the Queen was permitted to visit the King in person and he could lake his meals. But, finally, the Queen was not permitted to visit the King any more, and the King kept himself fit by walking up and down inside the prison. Ajatasattu, however, ordered that the soles of the King’s feet be cut open with a knife so that he could not walk.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  5. You can’t always cure

    Comment

    You can’t always cure, but you can always care. ~Ajahn Brahm

    You can't always cure, but you can always care-Ajahn Brahm

  6. Grant yourself a moment of peace

    Comment

    beautiful-water-flowing-brook-over-stone

    Grant yourself a moment of peace,
    and you will understand
    how foolishly you have scurried about.
    Learn to be silent,
    and you will notice that
    you have talked too much.
    Be kind,
    and you will realize that
    your judgment of others was too severe.

    ~The Tao of Wealth

     

  7. Devadatta’s plan to get more alms by winning over Ajatasattu

    Comment
    Devadatta's plan to get more alms by winning over Ajatasattu

    Devadatta’s plan to get more alms by winning over Ajatasattu

    46. Devadatta’s plan to get more alms by winning over Ajatasattu

    Soon after he had ordained as a monk, Venerable Devadatta practised meditation and attained superhuman power and even the six higher psychic powers. Because he possessed those powers he wanted to become a rival and take the Buddha’s place as the leader. Being eager for gain and honour he thought he would achieve his purpose by winning over Prince Ajatasattu, still a youth but with sure prospects of accession to the throne. Devadatta assumed the form of a lad with a girdle of snakes, and terrified Ajatasattu by appearing in his lap. He then comforted the Prince saying, “Oh, Prince, don’t get alarmed. I am the person known as Venerable Devadatta.” He then assumed his proper form as a monk with the bowl and robes, and stood in front of the prince.

    Ajatasattu marveling at the wonder paid him great honour, and sent him 500 dishes daily. Devadatta secured more than enough alms according to his original plan.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  8. If there is nothing you can do

    Comment

    If there is nothing you can do, then do nothing. If there is something you can do, then give it all you’ve got. ~Ajahn Brahm

    If there is nothing you can do, then do nothing. If there is something you can do, then give it all you've got- Ajahn Brahm

     

  9. Flower falls – even though we love it

    Comment

    A flower falls, even though we love it; and a weed grows, even though we do not love it. ~Dogen Zenji

    white flowers moving

  10. If you have a glass full of liquid

    Comment

    If you have a glass full of liquid you can discourse forever on its qualities, discuss whether it is cold, warm, whether it is really and truly composed of H-2-O, or even mineral water, or sake. Meditation is Drinking it! ~Taisen Deshimaru

    animated water

  11. A General offering meals to the Buddha

    Comment
    A General, a fresh convert to Buddhism, offering meals to the Buddha

    A General, a fresh convert to Buddhism, offering meals to the Buddha

    45. A General, a fresh convert to Buddhism, offering meals to the Buddha

    A General called “Siha” of Vesali was an important lay devotee of the teacher known as Nigantha Nataputta. He heard of the virtues of the three gems namely, the Buddha, the Doctrine and the Order from a gathering of Licchavi princes. Accordingly he asked his teacher to allow him to go to the Buddha, but was not allowed to go. He asked for permission for the second time but it was again refused. On the third occasion, however, without asking for permission he proceeded to where the Buddha was, with many followers in five hundred chariots.

    When he came to where the Buddha was he asked the Buddha several questions on points which were not clear to him and was thoroughly satisfied with the answers given. He then said, “I take my refuge, Lord, in the Buddha, the Doctrine and the Order. May the Lord receive me as a disciple who, from this day forth while his life lasts, has taken his refuge in them?”. After that the General requested the Buddha to visit his house on the morrow together with his retinue of monks to partake of food. He then, out of a very generous heart, served them with an excellent meal the next morning at his house.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  12. Greatest, Purest Love?

    Comment

    Greatest, Purest Love? Love and give kindness to people you don’t even know and your enemy. ~Master Cheng Yen

    waterfall

  13. A compassionate heart

    Comment

    A compassionate heart is a clear and cool place ~ Master Cheng Yen

    Buddha

  14. Buddha taming Ala Vaka, the demon-god

    Comment
    The Buddha taming Ala Vaka, the demon-god with a sermon on loving-kindness

    The Buddha taming Ala Vaka, the demon-god with a sermon on loving-kindness

    44. The Buddha taming Ala Vaka, the demon-god, with a sermon on loving-kindness

    There stood a giant banyan tree at a distance of a little more than three miles from Alavi city. Alavaka, the demon-god had his dwelling in that tree. One night Alavaka was attending a meeting of gods at the Himalayas, when the Buddha entered his dwelling in order to tame this cruel monster. The door-keeper of the dwelling, a deity, paying homage to the Buddha, said, “May I go and seek permission from Alavaka for you to enter his dwelling?” So saying, he went to the meeting of gods to get the permission. At that moment, Alavaka who had to keep his anger in check became furious when he heard from other gods about the arrival of the Buddha at his dwelling. He left the meeting at once and jumped on to the dizzy heights of Kelasa Mountain, and shouted out this challenge:

    “Alavaka am I!” Then throughout the night he flung all sorts of weapons at the Blessed One who was not hurt at all because of his infinite power of loving-kindness. Then Alavaka approached the Buddha who tamed him peacefully with a sermon on Loving-Kindness.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  15. We are in this together

    Comment

    It’s never his problem, her problem or my problem, it’s always our problem. We are in this together. That’s how you solve the problem. ~Ajahn Brahm

    It’s never his problem, her problem or my problem, it’s always our problem. We are in this together. That’s how you solve the problem-Ajahn Brahm

  16. Respect yourself

    Comment

    Respect yourself, so you can love all those on earth. ~ Master Cheng Yen

    Buddha in heaven

  17. Buddha preaching to Kisa Gotami

    Comment
    The Buddha preaching to Kisa Gotami asking for medicine for her dead son

    The Buddha preaching to Kisa Gotami asking for medicine for her dead son

    43. The Buddha preaching to Kisa Gotami asking for medicine for her dead son

    Kisa Gotami was the wife of a wealthy man of Savatthi worth 40 crores. She had an only son who died when he was just able to run about. She had never seen any death and, thinking that her son was only ill, did not cremate him. In her distress she took him in her arms and went about asking for medicine.

    One wise man thought that no one but the Buddha would know of any, and sent her to Him. Kisa Gotami showed her dead son and asked the Buddha to give the medicine that would cure her boy. The Buddha answered: ” I shall cure your boy if you get some mustard seeds from a house where no one has died”. Carrying her dead son, she wondered from door to door. But she could not find any house where no death had occurred. At last she began to learn the truth, “No house is free from death”. She went to a wood, laid her child there and returned to the Buddha, who comforted her by preaching to her the truth. She was established in the first holy stage of the Aryan

    Path, and was admitted into the Order of Nuns. She eventually became an Arahant.

    Rohini river lying between Kapilavatthu and Koliya was the main source of water supply for these two cities to irrigate their lands for growing crops.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  18. What’s more important

    Comment

    What’s more important, being right or living in harmony together? ~Ajahn Brahm

    What’s more important, being right or living in harmony together-Ajahn Brahm

  19. Difference Without Division

    Comment

    Diversity within a society does not have to be problematic; it can be a source of richness and enjoyment. We can recognize and enjoy differences, but we must be careful not to exaggerate their importance or solidify our differences. When we do, we easily lose sight of our shared humanity, and divide ourselves up into categories of us and them, higher and lower, better and worse. ~ 17th Karmapa

    flowers-and-butterflies

  20. Buddha preaching the sermon of peace

    Comment
    The Buddha preaching the sermon of peace from the air to prevent war between Kapila and Koliya

    The Buddha preaching the sermon of peace from the air to prevent war between Kapila and Koliya

    42. The Buddha preaching the sermon of peace from the air to prevent war between Kapila and Koliya

    Rohini river lying between Kapilavatthu and Koliya was the main source of water supply for these two cities to irrigate their lands for growing crops. At one time, when the crops became dry, the farmers from both cities went to draw water from the river when there was very little water and just enough left for them to take once only. A quarrel arose over it and there was an exchange of hot words touching the fair name of the Sakya clan. The Ministers including the one in charge of agriculture became so angry that they decided to settle this matter by battle and both sides sallied forth for a fight.

    The Buddha saw, with the eye of a Buddha, that there would be much blood-shed if the relatives of both sides engaged in battle. He, therefore, went alone and sat cross-legged in the air midway between the armed forces of both sides. When they saw the Blessed One in the air, the armed forces of both sides, who were all kinsmen, laid down their arms and paid homage to Him. The Buddha then admonished them by preaching a sermon of peace saying, “Are you going to destroy your priceless lives for the sake of a little bit of worthless water?”

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

Khmer Tipitaka 1 – 110

Khmer Tipitaka 1 – 110

The Tipitaka or Pali canon, is the collection of primary Pali language texts which form the doctrinal foundation of Theravada Buddhism. The three divisions of the Tipitaka are: Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka. ព្រះត្រៃបិដក ប្រែថា កញ្រ្ចែង ឬ ល្អី​ ៣ សម្រាប់ដាក់ផ្ទុកពាក្យពេចន៍នៃព្រះសម្មាសម្ពុទ្ធ

Listen to Khmer literature and Dhamma talk by His Holiness Jotannano Chuon Nath, Supreme Patriarch of Cambodia Buddhism.

Jendhamuni

As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, so the wise are not shaken by blame and praise. As a deep lake is clear and calm, so the wise become tranquil after they listened to the truth... Good people walk on regardless of what happens to them. Good people do not babble on about their desires. Whether touched by happiness or by sorrow, the wise never appear elated or depressed… ~The Dhammapada

Should anyone wish to ridicule me and make me an object of jest and scorn why should I possibly care if I have dedicated myself to others?

Let them do as they wish with me so long as it does not harm them. May no one who encounters me ever have an insignificant contact.

Regardless whether those whom I meet respond towards me with anger or faith, may the mere fact of our meeting contribute to the fulfilment of their wishes.

May the slander, harm and all forms of abuse that anyone should direct towards me act as a cause of their enlightenment.

Archives