1. An artificial tree being carried round by a happy crowd in celebration of a charity, during the days of Myanmar Kings

    Comment
    An artificial tree being carried round by a happy crowd in celebration of a charity, during the days of Myanmar Kings

    An artificial tree being carried round by a happy crowd in celebration of a charity, during the days of Myanmar Kings

    65. An artificial tree being carried round by a happy crowd in celebration of a charity, during the days of Myanmar Kings

    In the days of the Myanmar Kings, the rulers were just administrators and most of the ministers also dispensed justice well. Officers under their control were also prevented from doing any injustice or wrong. The people were law abiding and until not very long ago rains were regular, and even in dry zones agricultural land could be cultivated with success. Textiles, consumer goods and fancy goods were not imported into this country from foreign places in these days as at present. Consequently there was no drainage of the country’s resources to foreign lands. Paddy, rice and oil were produced in profusion and there was more than enough for local consumption. Scarcity of thefts and robberies kept the people happy and contented. They celebrated pagoda festivals and other charitable functions, and used to go round with an artificial tree laden with native cakes, sweet meats and fruits, such as plantains and coconuts, in a carefree and joyous mood of charitable display.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  2. Stone inscriptions of King Mindon

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    Stone inscriptions of King Mindon

    Stone inscriptions of King Mindon

    64. Stone inscriptions of King Mindon

    King Mindon, who founded the city and the palace of Mandalay, was a great supporter of the Buddhist religion. He used to confer titles upon, and offer the four necessities of monks to venerable monks distinguished for their learning in the Scriptures. He built huge monasteries in the eastern part of the city and donated them for occupation by large numbers of monks.
    He was not satisfied with such measures taken by him in support of the religion. He, therefore, had the Scriptures of the Buddha inscribed on stone slabs under the direct supervision of Maha Theras who were the most learned of the lot of ecclesiastical dignitaries on whom titles had been conferred for proficiency in the Scriptures. With reference to this act of having the Scriptures inscribed on stone slabs, King Mindon is known today as the “Royal Convener of the Fifth Buddhist Council”.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  3. Kalyani Ordination Hall, Pegu

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    Kalyani Ordination Hall, Pegu

    Kalyani Ordination Hall, Pegu

    63. Kalyani Ordination Hall, Pegu

    In olden days the monks of Burma, both in Burma proper and in Mon territory belonged to different sects and held different views. The practice of Buddhism could not therefore be preserved in its pristine purity. Dhammaceti, King of Hanthawaddy sent a religious mission consisting of forty four monks to Sri Lanka in 837 Burmese Era. (1476 C.E.) with a view to purifying the religious system in Myanmar. The monks on arrival in Sri Lanka had to be re-ordained in the Sima (place for ordination) in the Kalyani river. On return of these monks to Myanmar, the King had a new Ordination Hall consecrated in Pegu with their assistance and revived Buddhism on proper lines. This new Ordination was named ‘Kalyani Ordination Hall’ after the name of the Kalyani river in Sri Lanka. The Religious Chronicle and the historical account of this Ordination Hall have been inscribed on stone slabs which have been preserved to this day.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  4. Shwedagon Pagoda, Yangon

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    Shwedagon Pagoda, Yangon

    Shwedagon Pagoda, Yangon

    62. Shwedagon Pagoda, Yangon

    Centuries ago Tapussa and Bhallika, two merchants from Ukkala brought the sacred hairs given to them by the Buddha from (the Middle Districts of) India and enshrined them at the foot of a wood-oil tree on Singuttara Hill where the sacred relics of the former three Buddhas had already been enshrined. This pagoda is called “The Shrine of the Sacred Relics of Four Buddhas”, because it contains, enshrined within it, the sacred relics of the three Buddhas (namely, Kakusandha, Konagamana and Kassapa) as well as those of Gotama Buddha. It also takes the name “Shwedagon Pagoda” after the name of the town, Tigumba or Dagon (i.e., Yangon or Rangoon).

    Successive Mon Kings and Myanmar Kings vied with one another in maintaining and improving the Shwedagon which has thus been brought to its present condition and appearance. Shinsawbu, Queen Regent of Hanthawaddy gave up her throne when she grew old and set up a cantonment and palace on a pleasant piece of land to the north-west of the pagoda and resided there in constant veneration of the shrine. She died at the age of 76 in 831 Burmese Era. (1470 C.E.) bowing in reverence to the pagoda. The locality where the Queen lived in her old age is known to this day as Shinsawbu Hill.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  5. Ananda Pagoda, Pagan

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    Ananda Pagoda, Pagan

    Ananda Pagoda, Pagan

    61. Ananda Pagoda, Pagan

    Once upon a time, eight Arahants came to the palace of King Kyanzittha ( also known as Hti-hlaing-shin ) at Pagan and stood for alms. The King took the bowls and offered them meals. He then asked them “Where have you come from, Reverend Sirs?” The Arahants replied. “We have come from Gandamadana Mountain”. The King was very pleased and had great faith in them, and built for them a monastery for their residence during the rainy season. He also invited them to come to the palace every morning and have their meals there during the full three months of the rainy season, and fed them regularly.

    One day, the King asked the Arahants to make a cave, by using their superhuman power, in the likeness of the Nandamula Cave which stands at Gandamadana Mountain in the Himalayas. The Arahants complied with his request and fashioned a cave exactly like the one there. The King built a huge cave-temple in Pagan resembling in appearance the Nandamula Cave, and called it Nanda. It is now known as Ananda Pagoda, built in 452 Burmese Era. (1192 C.E.). It is famous all over the world as the best specimen of Myanmar (Burmese) architecture.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  6. Anawratha of Pagan conveying the Buddhist scriptures

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    Anawratha of Pagan conveying the Buddhist scriptures

    Anawratha of Pagan conveying the Buddhist scriptures

    60. Anawratha of Pagan conveying the Buddhist scriptures

    King Anawratha of Pagan conveyed the Buddhist scriptures from Thaton to Pagan for the benefit of all beings. He then removed the frontal bone, sacred relic of the Buddha, from Kaung-hmu-daw pagoda at Prome built by King Dutta-baung and took it also to Pagan. On arrival there he built a pagoda on the sand-bank of the Irrawaddy river near Pagan and enshrined the frontal bone of the Buddha, there. When the third terrace of this pagoda was constructed, he brought a replica of the Buddha’s tooth from Sri Lanka and enshrined it also in this pagoda. Before the construction of this pagoda was completed King Anawratha died.

    When Kyanzittha became King of Pagan in succession to Anawratha, he continued to build this pagoda as advised by the Venerable Arahan. This pagoda was known as Shwezigon (Golden Sandbank) pagoda because it stands upon a strip of sand bank. King Anawratha started its construction in 393 Burmese Era. (1033 C.E.) and Kyanzittha continued to build it and hoisted a golden hti(crown) on it in 452 Burmese Era. (1192 C.E.).

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  7. The Tipitaka being committed to writing on ola (palm) leaves during the reign of King Vattagamani Abhaya

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    The Tipitaka being committed to writing on ola (palm) leaves during the reign of King Vattagamani Abhaya

    The Tipitaka being committed to writing on ola (palm) leaves during the reign of King Vattagamani Abhaya

    59. The Tipitaka being committed to writing on ola (palm) leaves during the reign of King Vattagamani Abhaya

    From the time of Buddha’s life down to the time of King Vattagamani’s reign, the Tipitaka forming the teachings of the Blessed One were handed down from generation to generation of monks by word of mouth, by being learnt by heart. During the reign of King Vattagamani, however, trouble was given by Brahmana Tissa, who rose up in arms and there was also inference from Kings who were disbelievers in the Buddhist religion. The monks could not get enough food for their meals and had to make extraordinary efforts to retain in memory whatever parts of the Buddhist scriptures they had already learnt by heart.

    This was a matter for anxiety as, if the monks in future could not commit the Tipitaka scriptures to memory and recite them, the scriptures might disappear altogether. They therefore sought the assistance of King Vattagamani and held the Fourth Buddhist Council by committing the Tipitaka to writing on ola (palm) leaves.

    The expression “Writing committed to palm leaves” has come into usage with reference to this first act of the letters of the alphabet being written down on ola (palm) leaves.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  8. King Vattagamani Abhaya being accompanied by monks in marching out with his army to the battle-front

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    King Vattagamani Abhaya being accompanied by monks in marching out with his army to the battle-front

    King Vattagamani Abhaya being accompanied by monks in marching out with his army to the battle-front

    58. King Vattagamani Abhaya being accompanied by monks in marching out with his army to the battle-front

    King Vattagamani Abhaya was a staunch supporter and defender of the Buddhist religion in the island of Lanka (Ceylon). One day when he was about to go out to fight the Tamil Kings, the King went to the monastery and said to the Mahatheras, “Venerable Sirs, I shall have to go across the Ganga (the river) to promote the cause of Buddhism, and wish the Theras to accompany me on my journeys so that I can pay my respects to them at all times.”

    The Mahatheras selected 500 monks who were in their prime of life and sent them to accompany the King. King Vattagamani carried on battle while at the same time attending to the personal needs of the Theras in his company with regard to their food, medicine, etc. The spear used by the King contained a sacred relic of the Buddha embedded in it at its end. His motto runs thus:—”I have been doing my best to make Buddhism last long and not for my own personal gain”.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  9. The third Buddhist Council being held with the Venerable Moggaliputta Tissa as the presiding Thera

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    The third Buddhist Council being held with the Venerable Moggaliputta Tissa as the presiding Thera

    The third Buddhist Council being held with the Venerable Moggaliputta Tissa as the presiding Thera

    57. The third Buddhist Council being held with the Venerable Moggaliputta Tissa as the presiding Thera

    King Dhammasoka understood the essence of Buddhism, and gave great support to the cause of Buddhism by erecting rock-edicts in all parts of his territory enjoining upon the subjects to follow the Doctrine in their daily lives. With his royal patronage Buddhism flourished, and the Sasana gradually grew in importance and numbers. Tempted by worldly gain, many undesirables of alien sects joined the Order and polluted the Sasana by their corrupt lives and heretical views which they taught.

    Good monks could not live together with these sham monks and there was trouble. The King consulted the Venerable Moggaliputta Tissa to protect the Sasana. The King tested the monks and disrobed the undesirables to purify the Sasana. The Third Buddhist Council was then held by 1000 Arahants. with the Venerable Moggaliputta Tissa as the presiding Thera.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  10. King Asoka offering meal to young novice Nigrodha who sat upon the throne

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    King Asoka offering meal to young novice Nigrodha who sat upon the throne

    King Asoka offering meal to young novice Nigrodha who sat upon the throne

    56. King Asoka offering meal to young novice Nigrodha who sat upon the throne

    King Asoka regularly fed the Brahmin priests, in accordance with the custom of the royal household, before his conversion to Buddhism. But he was not pleased with their demeanour at meal-time, as they were neither clean nor calm. The King thought to himself, “Charity on such a lavish scale should be given in proper quarters”. Later, one day he saw a serene-looking young novice, quietly walking along the street with restrained senses.

    The King was so impressed with the deportment that the novice was invited to the palace at once and requested to occupy a suitable seat ; and the novice went up the throne and sat on it. The King then served him with an excellent meal and asked him to give an exposition of the Doctrine which his Teacher used to preach. The young novice Nigrodha delivered an instructive discourse on the following stanza of the Dhammapada:— “Heedfulness is the path to Deathlessness. Heedlessness is the path to death. The heedful do not die, the heedless are like unto the dead”.

    The word of the Buddha appealed to him and he became a Buddhist and staunch supporter of the religion.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  11. Venerable Yasa’s efforts to hold the second Buddhist council for the offense of monks collecting money

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    Venerable Yasa's efforts to hold the second Buddhist council for the offense of monks collecting money

    Venerable Yasa’s efforts to hold the second Buddhist council for the offense of monks collecting money

    55. Venerable Yasa’s efforts to hold the second Buddhist council for the offense of monks collecting money

    About 100 years after the death of the Buddha, monks of the Vajji clan did certain acts which were not becoming of monks. They begged for money, even an anna (a nickel) or two, from lay devotees who came to the monastery on Uposatha days to keep their precepts. The Venerable Yasa then said that it was not fit for monks to handle money. For that reason, they imposed a Vinaya Act on the Venerable Yasa by which it was made obligatory for the person who said so to tender an apology to lay devotees for alleged interference with their charitable motives.

    The Venerable Yasa went to the lay devotees and explained the true purport of the Buddha’s teachings, and when the lay devotees understood it they showed no further respect to monks who begged for alms in cash. The Venerable Yasa approached the distinguished Arahants and asked them to adjudge the matter, and they pronounced that it was not lawful according to the Vinaya for monks to handle money. After which, 700 distinguished Arahants were chosen and the Second Buddhist Council was held to protect the Doctrine.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  12. The first Buddhist council

    Comment
    The first Buddhist council

    The first Buddhist council

    54. The first Buddhist council

    About seven days after the Buddha had passed away, the Venerable Mahakassapa heard of His death, while he was resting on his way from Pava to Kusinara together with 500 Theras. All the junior Theras were plunged in deep grief and were weeping and lamenting. But a monk named Subhadda, who had entered the Order in his old age, was the only one that rejoiced over His death. “Grieve not, brothers,” said he, “weep not, we are now delivered of that Great Ascetic. He constantly worried us, saying ‘This is proper, this is not proper’. Now we are free to do what we like.”

    These unexpected words that fell from the lips of a disciple alarmed the Venerable Mahakassapa who became very concerned about the future of the Buddha’s religious system, but kept quiet. When the Buddha’s relics had been distributed, the Venerable Mahakassapa consulted the other Theras and suggested to them to hold a Council of leading Arahants to collect, classify and rehearse the teachings of the Buddha in order to protect and fortify the Sasana against such attacks as might be expected from monks of the type of Subhadda. They all welcomed the suggestion. King Ajatasattu was informed of the intention of the Samgha, and with his help, the First Buddhist council was held at Rajagaha with 500 Arahants.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  13. Dona, the professor, distributing the sacred relics of the Buddha to the rulers of eight states

    Comment
    Dona, the professor, distributing the sacred relics of the Buddha to the rulers of eight states

    Dona, the professor, distributing the sacred relics of the Buddha to the rulers of eight states

    53. Dona, the professor, distributing the sacred relics of the Buddha to the rulers of eight states

    Just before the Buddha passed away, he made a resolute wish that, “the bones of my body may be left over as relics in small bits” so that posterity may reverence them. Ajattasattu and other rulers heard of the Buddha’s death and came out with their own armies to fight for the possession of the sacred relies of the Buddha, if they should fail to get them by peaceful means. Dona the Brahmin was a virtuous professor who happened to have been a teacher of those rulers.

    There was a great excitement and disorder amongst the crowds present who were preparing to loot the relics. Now Professor Dona got up on an eminence and shouted at the crowd in an authoritative tone, when the din was silenced. Then he spoke to the crowd beginning with the words, “Listen to me, your teacher. Our Lord, the Buddha, used to preach on forbearance”. Then as agreed by the rulers of the eight states, the Professor distributed the sacred relics to them. They took the relies away and placed them inside pagodas and shrines and revered them as objects of worship.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  14. Parinibbana (death) of the Buddha in the Sala Grove of Kusinara State

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    Parinibbana (death) of the Buddha in the Sala Grove of Kusinara State

    Parinibbana (death) of the Buddha in the Sala Grove of Kusinara State

    52. Parinibbana (death) of the Buddha in the Sala Grove of Kusinara State

    From His 35th year, the date of His Enlightenment, the Buddha’s successful ministry lasted 45 years. When He attained His 80th year the Buddha had an attack of dysentery and lay down on a couch with its head to the north between twin sal-trees in the Sala Grove of Kusinara State. Men, higher and lower gods and monks were gathered, in large numbers, near the Blessed One in respectful adoration.

    Though he was very weak and weary, the Buddha was still addressing those present with words of exhortation. After addressing them the whole night the Blessed One spoke His last words, when it was nearing dawn, as follows:—”Behold, O disciples, I exhort you. Subject to decay are all conditioned things. Strive on with heedfulness”. The Buddha then attained the Ecstasies and arrived at the cessation of perception and sensation, and finally the Blessed One passed away; and there was an earthquake to mark His death.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

     

  15. Venerable Kumara Kassapa explaining to the governor of Payasi

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    Venerable Kumara Kassapa explaining to the governor of Payasi the existence of a future world

    Venerable Kumara Kassapa explaining to the governor of Payasi the existence of a future world

    51. Venerable Kumara Kassapa explaining to the governor of Payasi the existence of a future world

    The Governor of Payasi was of the wrong belief that there was no future world, that there were no such beings as higher and lower gods produced without any apparent cause, that there was no such thing as Hell and that there were no effects of good or bad deeds done. According to his view “if a man dies he is not reborn”. Venerable Kumara Kassapa was an Arahant who could preach well. The Governor of Payasi with a great crowd of men came to the Arahant and stated to him his religious views.
    Venerable Kumara Kassapa pointed out to him the sun and the moon and asked him, “Are the sun and the moon you see over there in this or another world? Are the beings living there human or celestial?” The Governor could not answer that the sun and the moon were in this world ; nor could he say that their inhabitants were human beings. He had, therefore, to admit that “those planets are in another world and their inhabitants are celestial beings”. He was converted from his wrong faith by being asked questions of this nature.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  16. King Ajatasattu coming out to pay his respects to the Buddha

    Comment
    King Ajatasattu coming out to pay his respects to the Buddha and his disciples

    King Ajatasattu coming out to pay his respects to the Buddha and his disciples

    50. King Ajatasattu coming out to pay his respects to the Buddha and his disciples

    After the death of his father, King Bimbisara, King Ajatasattu could not sleep well and used to wake up with a start. He wanted to go to the Buddha so as to get some mental relief, but he dared not go because he had done the most heinous act of patricide. On the night of the full noon day in the month of Tazaungmon (November) he murmured in the presence of his courtiers as follows:- “Whom shall I approach on such a pleasant night in order to have a clear and peaceful mind?”

    The courtiers made several suggestions to him but he did not accept any of them. He took the suggestion of the Physician Jivaka, and left the city with a procession of five hundred female elephants, fully bedecked and caparisoned, and mounted by five hundred women disguised in the dress of soldiers; and accompanied by torch-bearers to show the way. When he arrived at the Mango Park of Jivaka, he saw the Blessed One and over one thousand holy monks so quiet and peaceful that the sight at once filled his mind with peace and hope.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  17. The Blessed one taming Nalagiri elephant which was sent to crush him

    Comment
    The Blessed one taming Nalagiri elephant which was sent to crush him

    The Blessed one taming Nalagiri elephant which was sent to crush him

    49. The Blessed one taming Nalagiri elephant which was sent to crush him

    After the death of King Bimbisara, Devadatta made several attempts to kill the Buddha, but he was not successful. So he went to the elephant-keepers and said to them. “Venerable Theras like us who are recognized by the King can use our influence to get you promotion in your service. Therefore, you had better carry out my instructions. If the Venerable Gotama should pass this way, set the full grown male elephant, Nalagiri, upon Him”.

    Nalagiri was a very ferocious elephant which used to gore men to death. The Blessed One, with his retinue of holy monks, was coming into the city of Rajagaha on his alms-round, when the elephant-keepers, desirous of gaining promotion in service, set the full-grown elephant in the direction of the Buddha. The Blessed One stood where he was and sent out his thought of loving-kindness towards the elephant Nalagiri, which was running towards him to crush him down. When the elephant came near the Buddha, it stood quietly before Him listening to the words of advice uttered by Him.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  18. King Ajatasattu asking his mother whether his father loved him

    Comment
    King Ajatasattu asking his mother whether his father loved him

    King Ajatasattu asking his mother whether his father loved him

    48. King Ajatasattu asking his mother whether his father loved him

    King Bimbisara died soon after the soles of his feet had been cut open with a knife. At the same time a son had been born to King Ajatasattu. The courtiers brought two messages: one, about the death of his father and the other about the birth of his son. They first presented him the message about the birth of his son. Love sprang in his heart upon his new-born son, right from the very marrow of his bones. He then began to have sympathy for his father, placing himself in the position of his father with regard to himself when he was a baby.

    He, therefore, gave the order :- “Set free my father at once”. But the courtiers presented to him the message of his father’s death, and he regretted very much for his hasty action. He, therefore, went to his mother and asked her, “Mother, did my father love me when I was a baby?” The Queen Mother then said, “What a question you have asked’?” When you were young and had a sore called willow in your finger, your father kept it inside his mouth. The sore burst inside his mouth and pus came out ; even then instead of spitting the matter out he swallowed it lest it would cause you pain by taking the finger out”. When she said this, both the mother and the son wept together.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  19. Prince Ajatasattu ordering that the soles of his father’s feet be cut open with a knife

    Comment
    Prince Ajatasattu ordering that the soles of his father's feet be cut open with a knife

    Prince Ajatasattu ordering that the soles of his father’s feet be cut open with a knife

    47. Prince Ajatasattu ordering that the soles of his father’s feet be cut open with a knife

    Venerable Devadatta instigated Prince Ajatasattu to kill his father King Bimbisara as he thought that, if the Prince became King in succession to his father, he would be able to take the place of the Buddha. The Prince was of the view that whatever his teacher Devadatta said was good, and was on his way to carry out his plan to murder his father. His father questioned him and the Prince admitted that he plotted to kill him because he wanted to become King. King Bimbisara gave up the throne in his favour.

    After that, Venerable Devadatta told him that he would be able to rule without any risk of losing the throne only if his father was no longer alive. Prince Ajatasattu was impressed with this suggestion. But he did nor wish to kill his father straightway. So he caused his father to be cast in prison. At first, the Princes mother, the Queen was permitted to visit the King in person and he could lake his meals. But, finally, the Queen was not permitted to visit the King any more, and the King kept himself fit by walking up and down inside the prison. Ajatasattu, however, ordered that the soles of the King’s feet be cut open with a knife so that he could not walk.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

  20. Devadatta’s plan to get more alms by winning over Ajatasattu

    Comment
    Devadatta's plan to get more alms by winning over Ajatasattu

    Devadatta’s plan to get more alms by winning over Ajatasattu

    46. Devadatta’s plan to get more alms by winning over Ajatasattu

    Soon after he had ordained as a monk, Venerable Devadatta practised meditation and attained superhuman power and even the six higher psychic powers. Because he possessed those powers he wanted to become a rival and take the Buddha’s place as the leader. Being eager for gain and honour he thought he would achieve his purpose by winning over Prince Ajatasattu, still a youth but with sure prospects of accession to the throne. Devadatta assumed the form of a lad with a girdle of snakes, and terrified Ajatasattu by appearing in his lap. He then comforted the Prince saying, “Oh, Prince, don’t get alarmed. I am the person known as Venerable Devadatta.” He then assumed his proper form as a monk with the bowl and robes, and stood in front of the prince.

    Ajatasattu marveling at the wonder paid him great honour, and sent him 500 dishes daily. Devadatta secured more than enough alms according to his original plan.

    THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF BUDDHISM
    by ASHIN JANAKA BHIVAMSA (Aggamahapandita)
    Artist: U Ba Kyi | Link to this post

Khmer Tipitaka 1 – 110

Khmer Tipitaka 1 – 110

The Tipitaka or Pali canon, is the collection of primary Pali language texts which form the doctrinal foundation of Theravada Buddhism. The three divisions of the Tipitaka are: Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka. ព្រះត្រៃបិដក ប្រែថា កញ្រ្ចែង ឬ ល្អី​ ៣ សម្រាប់ដាក់ផ្ទុកពាក្យពេចន៍នៃព្រះសម្មាសម្ពុទ្ធ

Listen to Khmer literature and Dhamma talk by His Holiness Jotannano Chuon Nath, Supreme Patriarch of Cambodia Buddhism.

Jendhamuni

As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, so the wise are not shaken by blame and praise. As a deep lake is clear and calm, so the wise become tranquil after they listened to the truth... Good people walk on regardless of what happens to them. Good people do not babble on about their desires. Whether touched by happiness or by sorrow, the wise never appear elated or depressed… ~The Dhammapada

Should anyone wish to ridicule me and make me an object of jest and scorn why should I possibly care if I have dedicated myself to others?

Let them do as they wish with me so long as it does not harm them. May no one who encounters me ever have an insignificant contact.

Regardless whether those whom I meet respond towards me with anger or faith, may the mere fact of our meeting contribute to the fulfilment of their wishes.

May the slander, harm and all forms of abuse that anyone should direct towards me act as a cause of their enlightenment.

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