1. Mind’s ultimate nature

    Comment

    Mind’s ultimate nature, emptiness endowed with vividness,
    I was told is the real Buddha.
    Recognizing this should help me
    Not to be stuck with thoughts of hierarchy.

    Mind’s ultimate nature, its emptiness aspect,
    I was told is the real Dharma.
    Recognizing this should help me
    Not to be stuck with thoughts of political correctness.

    Mind’s ultimate nature, its vivid aspect,
    I was told is the real Sangha.
    Recognizing this should help me
    Not to be stuck with thoughts of equal rights.

    One cannot disassociate emptiness from vividness.
    This inseparability I was told is the Guru.
    Recognizing this should help me
    Not to be stuck with depending on chauvinist lamas.

    This nature of mind has never been stained by duality,
    This stainlessness I was told is the deity.
    Recognizing this should help me
    Not to be stuck with the categories of “gender” or “culture.”

    This nature of mind is spontaneously present.
    That spontaneity I was told is the dakini aspect.
    Recognizing this should help me
    Not to be stuck with fear of being sued.

    ~ Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche

  2. Letting be

    Comment

    The method that the Buddha discovered is meditation. He discovered that struggling to find answers did not work. It was only when there were gaps in his struggle that insights came to him. He began to realize that there was a sane, awake quality within him that manifested itself only in the absence of struggle. So the practice of meditation involves “letting be.” ~ Chögyam Trungpa

  3. Sadness

    Comment

    The most crucial prerequisite for the practise of dharma is complete isolation because when we are alone, we are subject to fewer distractions, creating the perfect conditions for sadness to grow in our minds.

    For those who know how to use it, sadness is a fertile ground from which all kinds of beneficial thoughts can spring with very little effort.

    Jigme Lingpa described sadness as one of the most invaluable kinds of noble wealth, and in the sutras Buddha hailed sadness as the trailblazer for all subsequent good qualities.

    With sadness comes trust and devotion, which, once developed, mean the practises of shamatha and vipashyana require very little effort. Shamatha practise ensures that mind becomes malleable and workable, and a flexible mind makes vipashyana relatively easy to accomplish. ~ Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche

  4. The Story of Thera Mahakappina

    Comment

    Verse 79: He who drinks in the Dhamma lives happily with a serene mind; the wise man always takes delight in the Dhamma (Bodhipakkhiya Dhamma) expounded by the Noble Ones (ariyas).

    The Story of Thera Mahakappina

    While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (79) of this book, with reference to Thera Mahakappina.

    Mahakappina was king of Kukkutavati. He had a queen named Anoja; he also had one thousand ministers to help him rule the country. One day, the king accompanied by those one thousand ministers, was out in the park. There, they met some merchants from Savatthi. On learning about the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Samgha from these merchants the king and his ministers immediately set out for Savatthi.

    On that day, when the Buddha surveyed the world with his supernormal power, he saw in his vision, Mahakappina and his ministers coming towards Savatthi. He also knew that they were due for arahatship. The Buddha went to a place one hundred and twenty yojanas away from Savatthi to meet them. There, he waited for them under a banyan tree on the bank of the river Candabhaga. King Mahakappina and his ministers came to the place where the Buddha was waiting for them. When they saw the Buddha, with six-coloured rays radiating from his body, they approached the Buddha and paid homage to him. The Buddha then delivered a discourse to them. After listening to the discourse the king and all his ministers attained Sotapatti Fruition, and they asked the Buddha to permit them to join the Order. The Buddha, reflecting on their past and finding that they had made offerings of yellow robes in a past existence, said to them, “Ehi bhikkhu”, and they all became bhikkhus.

    Meanwhile, Queen Anoja, learning about the king’s departure for Savatthi, sent for the wives of the one thousand ministers, and together with them followed the king’s trail. They too came to the place where the Buddha was and seeing the Buddha with a halo of six colours, paid homage to him. All this time, the Buddha by exercising his supernormal power had made the king and his ministers invisible so that their wives did not see them. The queen therefore enquired where the king and his ministers were. The Buddha told the queen and her party to wait for a while and that the king would soon come with his ministers. The Buddha then delivered another discourse; at the end of this discourse the king and his ministers attained arahatship; the queen and the wives of the ministers attained Sotapatti Fruition. At that instant, the queen and her party saw the newly admitted bhikkhus and recognized them as their former husbands.

    The ladies also asked permission from the Buddha to enter the Order of Bhikkhunis; so they were directed to go ahead to Savatthi. There they entered the Order and very soon they also attained arahatship. The Buddha then returned to the Jetavana monastery accompanied by one thousand bhikkhus.

    At the Jetavana monastery, Thera Mahakappina while resting during the night or during the day would often say, “Oh, what happiness!” (Aho Sukham). The bhikkhus, hearing him saying this so many times a day told the Buddha about it. To them the Buddha replied, “My son Kappina having had the taste of the Dhamma lives happily with a serene mind; he is saying these words of exultation repeatedly with reference to Nibbana.”

    Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

    Verse 79: He who drinks in the Dhamma lives happily with a serene mind; the wise man always takes delight in the Dhamma (Bodhipakkhiya Dhamma) expounded by the Noble Ones (ariyas).

    Dhammapada Verse 79
    Mahakappinatthera Vatthu

    Dhammapiti sukham seti
    vippasannena cetasa
    ariyappavedite dhamme
    sada ramati pandito.

    Source: Tipitaka

  5. The very essence of all Dharma

    Comment

    If someone has compassion, he is a Buddha;
    Without compassion, he is a Lord of Death.

    With compassion, the root of Dharma is planted,
    Without compassion, the root of Dharma is rotten.

    One with compassion is kind even when angry,
    One without compassion will kill even as he smiles.

    For one with compassion, even his enemies will turn into friends,
    Without compassion, even his friends turn into enemies.

    With compassion, one has all Dharmas,
    Without compassion, one has no Dharma at all.

    With compassion, one is a Buddhist,
    Without compassion, one is worse than a heretic.

    Even if meditating on voidness, one needs compassion as its essence.
    A Dharma practitioner must have a compassionate nature.

    Compassion is the distinctive characteristic of Buddhism.
    Compassion is the very essence of all Dharma.

    Great compassion is like a wish-fulfilling gem.
    Great compassion will fulfill the hopes of self and others.

    Therefore, all of you, practitioners and laypeople,
    Cultivate compassion and you will achieve Buddhahood.

    May all men and women who hear this song,
    With great compassion, benefit all beings!

    ~ Shabkar

  6. Look at your own eyes without using a mirror

    Comment

    A great teacher of meditation once said, “Meditating is trying to look at your own eyes without using a mirror.” That’s a very mysterious statement. How can we look at our own eyes without a mirror? The idea stops us in our tracks. But maybe we can explore that in our practice. The only way to solve this riddle is just to be there. ~ Chögyam Trungpa

  7. What the Buddha taught

    Comment

    Just as a grammarian first has students
    Read a model of the alphabet,
    Buddha taught students
    The doctrine that they could bear.

    To some he taught doctrines
    To turn them away from ill-deeds.
    To some, for the sake of achieving merit.
    To some, doctrines based on duality.

    To some, doctrines based on non-duality.
    To some, what is profound and frightening to the fearful –
    Having an essence of emptiness and compassion –
    The means of achieving unsurpassed enlightenment.

    ~ Nagarjuna

  8. Dharma is the truth of the reality

    Comment

    The dharma is based on honesty, on not having self-deception of any kind. When the dharma says blue, it is blue; when it says red, it is red. Dharma is like saying fire is hot, or the sky is blue: it is speaking the truth. The difference is that dharma is the truth of the reality of the journey toward freedom. Saying that red is red does not particularly liberate you from seeing green or yellow. But when dharma speaks about reality, we see that it is worth stepping out of our little world of habitual patterns, our little nest. In that way, the dharma brings greater vision. ~ Chögyam Trungpa

  9. The Story of Thera Channa

    Comment

    Verse 78: One should not associate with bad friends, nor with the vile. One should associate with good friends, and with those who are noble.

    1. namayanti: to bend, to incline a person’s heart or will. In the case of fletchers, to make the arrows straight; in the case of carpenters, to make the timber into things that people want, by cutting, sawing and planing.

    The Story of Thera Channa

    While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (78) of this book, with reference to Thera Channa.

    Channa was the attendant who accompanied Prince Siddhattha when he renounced the world and left the palace on horseback. When the prince attained Buddhahood, Channa also became a bhikkhu. As a bhikkhu, he was very arrogant and overbearing because of his close connection to the Buddha. Channa used to say, “I came along with my Master when he left the palace for the forest. At that time, I was the only companion of my Master and there was no one else. But now, Sariputta and Moggallana are saying, ‘we are the Chief Disciples,’ and are strutting about the place.”

    When the Buddha sent for him and admonished him for his behaviour, he kept silent but continued to abuse and taunt the two Chief Disciples. Thus the Buddha sent for him and admonished him three times; still, he did not change. And again, the Buddha sent for Channa and said, “Channa, these two noble bhikkhus are good friends to you; you should associate with them and be on good terms with them.”

    Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

    Verse 78: One should not associate with bad friends, nor with the vile. One should associate with good friends, and with those who are noble.

    In spite of repeated admonitions and advice given by the Buddha, Channa did as he pleased and continued to scold and abuse the bhikkhus. The Buddha, knowing this, said that Channa would not change during the Buddha’s lifetime but after his demise (parinibbana) Channa would surely change. On the eve of his parinibbana, the Buddha called Thera Ananda to his bedside and instructed him to impose the Brahma-punishment (Brahmadanda) to Channa; i.e., for the bhikkhus to simply ignore him and to have nothing to do with him.

    After the parinibbana of the Buddha, Channa, learning about the punishment from Thera Ananda, felt a deep and bitter remorse for having done wrong and he fainted three times. Then, he owned up his guilt to the bhikkhus and asked for pardon. From that moment, he changed his ways and outlook. He also obeyed their instructions in his meditation practice and soon attained arahatship.

    Dhammapada Verse 78
    Channatthera Vatthu

    Na bhaje papake mitte
    na bhaje purisadhame
    bhajetha mitte kalyane
    bhajetha purisuttame.

    Source: Tipitaka

  10. Forgiveness will not be possible until compassion is born in our heart

    Comment

    Forgiveness will not be possible until compassion is born in our heart. Even if you want to forgive, you cannot forgive. In order to be compassionate, you have to understand why the other person has done that to you and your people. You have to see that they are victims of their own confusion, their own worldview, their own grieving, their own discrimination, their own lack of understanding and compassion. ~Thich Nhat Hanh

    Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

     

  11. The Story of Bhikkhus Assaji and Punabbasuka

    Comment

    Verse 77: The man of wisdom should admonish others; he should give advice and should prevent others from doing wrong; such a man is held dear by the good; he is disliked only by the bad.

    1. anusaseyya: to give advice in advance; also to give advice repeatedly.

    The Story or Bhikkhus Assaji and Punabbasuka

    While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (77) of this book, with reference to bhikkhus Assaji and Punabbasuka.

    Bhikkhus Assaji and Punabbasuka and their five hundred disciples were staying at Kitagiri village. While staying there they made their living by planting flowering plants and fruit trees for gain, thus violating the rules of Fundamental Precepts for bhikkhus.

    The Buddha hearing about these bhikkhus sent his two Chief Disciples Sariputta and Maha Moggallana, to stop them from committing further misconduct. To his two Chief Disciples the Buddha said, “Tell those bhikkhus not to destroy the faith and generosity of the lay disciples by misconduct and if anyone should disobey, drive him out of the monastery. Do not hesitate to do as I told you, for only fools dislike being given good advice and being forbidden to do evil.”

    Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

    Verse 77: The man of wisdom should admonish others; he should give advice and should prevent others from doing wrong; such a man is held dear by the good; he is disliked only by the bad.

    Dhammapada Verse 77
    Assajipunabbasuka Vatthu

    Ovadeyya’nusaseyya1
    asabbha ca nivaraye
    satam hi so piyo hoti
    asatam hoti appiyo.

    Source: Tipitaka

  12. If you are filled with anger…

    Comment

    If you are filled with anger, you create more suffering for yourself than for the other person. When you are inhabited by the energy of anger, you want to punish, you want to destroy. That is why those who are wise do not want to say anything or do anything while the anger is still in them. So you try to bring peace into yourself first. When you are calm, when you are lucid, you will see that the other person is a victim of confusion, of hate, of violence transmitted by society, by parents, by friends, by the environment. When you are able to see that, your anger is no longer there. ~Thich Nhat Hanh

     

  13. The Story of Thera Radha

    Comment

    Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

    Verse 76: One should follow a man of wisdom who rebukes one for one’s faults, as one would follow a guide to some buried treasure. To one who follows such a wise man, it will be an advantage and not a disadvantage.

    The Story of Thera Radha

    While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (76) of this book, with reference to Thera Radha, who was at one time a poor old Brahmin.

    Radha was a poor brahmin who stayed in the monastery doing small services for the bhikkhus. For his services he was provided with food and clothing and other needs, but was not encouraged to join the Order, although he had a strong desire to become a bhikkhu.

    One day, early in the morning, when the Buddha surveyed the world with his supernormal power, he saw the poor old brahmin in his vision and knew that he was due for arahatship. So the Buddha went to the old man, and learned from him that the bhikkhus of the monastery did not want him to join the Order. The Buddha therefore called all the bhikkhus to him and asked them, “Is there any bhikkhu here who recollects any good turn done to him by this old man?” To this question, the Venerable Sariputta replied, “Venerable Sir, I do recollect an instance when this old man offered me a spoonful of rice.” “If that be so,” the Buddha said, “shouldn’t you help your benefactor get liberated from the ills of life?” Then the Venerable Sariputta agreed to make the old man a bhikkhu and he was duly admitted to the Order. The Venerable Sariputta guided the old bhikkhu and the old bhikkhu strictly followed his guidance. Within a few days, the old bhikkhu attained arahatship.

    When the Buddha next came to see the bhikkhus, they reported to him how strictly the old bhikkhu followed the guidance of the Venerable Sariputta. To them, the Buddha replied that a bhikkhu should be amenable to guidance like Radha, and should not resent when rebuked for any fault or failing.

    Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

    Verse 76: One should follow a man of wisdom who rebukes one for one’s faults, as one would follow a guide to some buried treasure. To one who follows such a wise man, it will be an advantage and not a disadvantage.

    Dhammapada Verse 76
    Radhatthera Vatthu

    Nidhinamva pavattaram
    yam passe vajjadassinam
    niggayhavadim medhavim
    tadisam panditam bhaje
    tadisam bhajamanassa
    seyyo hoti na papiyo.

    Source: Tipitaka

  14. The highest state of meditation is Samadhi

    Comment

    The highest state of meditation is Samadhi, where there is no ego anymore, no doubts, no me, no you, no notion of time, no eating, no talking, no walking, no working and not doing anything at all, realizing that the Self is action-less. ~Dharma Mittra

     

  15. Just as you feel love for your mother of this life…

    Comment

    Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

    Just as you think of your mother in this life, therefore,
    Contemplate the suffering and hardship
    Of all those poor beings who were your mothers before,
    And shed tears for them all, again and again.

    Just as you feel love for your mother of this life,
    Generate love for all beings, your mothers from the past,
    And arouse compassion and bodhichitta too —
    With this, you will enter the ranks of the Mahayana.

    Again and again, bring to mind all the kindness
    Of beings of the six classes, your own kind parents.
    If you care for them like your mother of this life,
    They will love you too, as their very own child.

    ~ Shabkar

  16. If you open your heart and become like a child

    Comment

    If you open your heart and become like a child, you will always be blissful, always content. ~Dharma Mittra

  17. Expectations make you restless

    Comment

    It’s a mistake to expect benefits from any pose. Expectations make you restless because if you fail to get what you expect, you feel miserable. Yoga practice is an act of adoration to the Lord. You do it because it has to be done. If you have this mental attitude, your selfishness disappears and the benefits come. ~Dharma Mittra

    Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

  18. Nature refuses to be rushed

    Comment

    Always remember that Nature refuses to be rushed. She can only be made to evolve and that takes time, so take heart. ~Dharma Mittra

    Photo credit: Randy Neufeldt

  19. The Story of Samanera Tissa of the Forest Monastery

    Comment

    Verse 75: Indeed, the path that leads to worldly gain is one and the Path that leads to Nibbana is another. Fully comprehending this, the bhikkhu, the disciple of the Buddha, should not take delight in worldly gain and honour, but devote himself to solitude, detachment and the realization of Nibbana.

    1.Vivekamanubruhaye (vivekam + anubruhaye): Viveka – solitary seclusion. According to the Commentary, the three kinds of vivekas are kayaviveka (seclusion of the body or solitude); cittaviveka (detachment of the mind from human passions) and upadhiviveka (Nibbana).

    The Story of Samanera Tissa of the Forest Monastery

    While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (75) of this book, with reference to Tissa, a samanera, who dwelt in a forest monastery.

    Tissa was the son of a rich man from Savatthi. His father used to offer alms-food to the Chief Disciple Sariputta in their house and so Tissa even as a child had met the Chief Disciple on many occasions. At the age of seven he became a novice (samanera) under the Chief Disciple Sariputta. While he was staying at the Jetavana monastery, many of his friends and relatives came to see him, bringing presents and offerings. The samanera found these visits to be very tiresome; so after taking a subject of meditation from the Buddha, he left for a forest monastery. Whenever a villager offered him anything, Tissa would just say ‘May you be happy, may you be liberated from the ills of life,’ (“Sukhita hotha, dukkha muccatha”), and would go on his own way. While he stayed at the forest monastery, he ardently and diligently practised meditation, and at the end of three months he attained arahatship. Continue reading

  20. The Story of Citta the Householder

    Comment

    Verse 73: The foolish bhikkhu desires praise for qualities he does not have, precedence among bhikkhus, authority in the monasteries, and veneration from those unrelated to him.

    Verse 74: “Let both laymen and bhikkhus think that things are done because of me; let them obey me in all matters, great and small.” Such being the thoughts of the fool, his greed and his pride grow.

    1. parakulesu: those outside the family; (para = outside or others).

    2. gihi: short form for gahapati, householder.

    The Story of Citta the Householder

    While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verses (73) and (74) of this book, with reference to Thera Sudhamma and Citta the householder.

    Citta, a householder, once met Thera Mahanama, one of the group of the first five bhikkhus (Pancavaggis), going on an alms-round, and invited the thera to his house. There, he offered alms-food to the thera and after listening to the discourse given by him, Citta attained Sotapatti Fruition. Later, Citta built a monastery in his mango grove. There, he looked to the needs of all bhikkhus who came to the monastery and Bhikkhu Sudhamma was installed as the resident bhikkhu.

    One day, the two Chief Disciples of the Buddha, the Venerable Sariputta and the Venerable Maha Moggallana, came to the monastery and after listening to the discourse given by the Venerable Sariputta, Citta attained Anagami Fruition. Then, he invited the two Chief Disciples to his house for alms-food the next day. He also invited Thera Sudhamma, but Thera Sudhamma refused in anger and said, “You invite me only after the other two.” Citta repeated his invitation, but it was turned down. Nevertheless, Thera Sudhamma went to the house of Citta early on the following day. But when invited to enter the house, Thera Sudhamma refused and said that he would not sit down as he was going on his alms-round. But when he saw the things that were to be offered to the two Chief Disciples, he envied them so much that he could not restrain his anger. He abused Citta and said, “I don’t want to stay in your monastery any longer,” and left the house in anger. Continue reading

Khmer Tipitaka 1 – 110

Khmer Tipitaka 1 – 110

The Tipitaka or Pali canon, is the collection of primary Pali language texts which form the doctrinal foundation of Theravada Buddhism. The three divisions of the Tipitaka are: Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka. ព្រះត្រៃបិដក ប្រែថា កញ្រ្ចែង ឬ ល្អី​ ៣ សម្រាប់ដាក់ផ្ទុកពាក្យពេចន៍នៃព្រះសម្មាសម្ពុទ្ធ

Listen to Khmer literature and Dhamma talk by His Holiness Jotannano Chuon Nath, Supreme Patriarch of Cambodia Buddhism.

Jendhamuni

As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, so the wise are not shaken by blame and praise. As a deep lake is clear and calm, so the wise become tranquil after they listened to the truth... Good people walk on regardless of what happens to them. Good people do not babble on about their desires. Whether touched by happiness or by sorrow, the wise never appear elated or depressed… ~The Dhammapada

Should anyone wish to ridicule me and make me an object of jest and scorn why should I possibly care if I have dedicated myself to others?

Let them do as they wish with me so long as it does not harm them. May no one who encounters me ever have an insignificant contact.

Regardless whether those whom I meet respond towards me with anger or faith, may the mere fact of our meeting contribute to the fulfilment of their wishes.

May the slander, harm and all forms of abuse that anyone should direct towards me act as a cause of their enlightenment.

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